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The Landfill Dancers by Mary Kasimor Now Available!

 

In The Landfill Dancers, Mary Kasimor feasts and fetes us on precision in freedom and pleasure in disequilibrium via “sounds to dream” and “unspeakable/art that reflect[s] ourselves.” An organic whole of refined beauty and sophistication, these lapidary artifacts of rigorous & disciplined experimentation offer a dazzling array of delicate yet potent expansions of lyric’s intellectual, aesthetic, & emotional potential via a web of variations on Kasimor’s invented forms, crafted and turned to frameworks of implication as sharp and graceful as razor wire lace. Rich with “the sound of broken beauty,” “tight and magnificent” as a futuristic skyline of architectural masterworks, these expectation-defying constructs manage to be both whimsical and sound. Like the gleaming city-scape of an idealized future, The Landfill Dancers is populated by one perfectly executed and imaginatively liberated structure after another, adding up to a remarkable whole that is diverse yet unified, richly textured, and precise – a sharp and soaring verbal landscape to study and admire.

—Susan Lewis, author of How to be Another

Woven, organic typographies, project lullaby hallucinations in the library. Squeeze dioxides of anatomic losses, wounding the quiet blood of the afternoon naps, born of cotton innocence. Survival with no music, a piano plays the brain. Mary Kasimor makes a mannequin smile on a day of daffodils, of many colored techno screams, a young machine running into the forest needing creation, as bone and skin and minutes slip from the shoulder. The Landfill Dancers: I’d copy here all of those lines. This poetry’s the stuff.

—Jared Schickling, author of The Pink

Monks, nuns, crows, saints, mimes, phantom fire-eaters, dogs, and "selves without a string" dance through the surreal pastoral of a postmodern world. Human and other animate bodies eat, scatter, dream, reflect, and sing in a fugue of fragmented voices. In this memorable collection, Mary Kasimor enacts an "image drama" and "performance burlesque" across every poetic line, surprising the reader with a new "species of FORM." Watch your step because The Landfill Dancers will take you where the wild is always open.

—Craig Santos Perez, author of from unincorporated territory


Mary Kasimor has been most recently published in Yew Journal, Big Bridge, Certain Circuits, MadHat, The Bakery, Altered Scale, Horse Less Review, Word For/Word, Posit, and The Missing Slate. She received a Fellowship from US Poets in Mexico for the 2011 Conference. She has had several books of poetry published including Silk String Arias (BlazeVOX Books), & Cruel Red (Otoliths Books) and The Windows Hallucinate (LRL Textile Series).


Book Information:

· Paperback: 72 pages

· Binding: Perfect-Bound

· Publisher: BlazeVOX [books] 

· ISBN: 978-1-60964-173-3

$16

 
 
 

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Nested Dolls by Clayton Eshleman Now Available!

 In Nested Dolls, Clayton Eshleman weaves threads of myth, dream, memory, and imagination through a work etched in what he might call, after Adorno, a late style, wherein affirmation ventures forth in the face of annihilation. These are nestual investigations of abyssal loss, death, and rebirth coiled within one another, explorations of the “reality of the invisible world” and the “labyrinth underlying the poem” offering further episodes in the life of the Minotaur and the Spider that have marked Eshleman’s career as a poet for more than five decades.

 
 
—Stuart Kendall
 
 
 
 
 
 
Clayton Eshleman’s publications include The Complete Poetry of César Vallejo (University of California Press, 2007), The Grindstone of Rapport / A Clayton Eshleman Reader (Black Widow Press, 2008), Anticline (Black Widow Press, 2010), Solar Throat Slashed (a translation of Aimé Césaire’s Soleil cou coupé, with A. James Arnold, Wesleyan University Press, 2011), An Anatomy of the Night (BlazeVOX Press, 2011), and Endure (a selected translations of Bei Dao, with Lucas Klein, Black Widow Press, 2011). Eshleman is the first poet to realize a huge, researched, and imaginative project, in prose and poetry, on Ice Age cave art: Juniper Fuse: Upper Paleolithic Imagination & the Construction of the Underworld (Wesleyan University Press, 2003). He was also the founder and editor of Caterpillar magazine (1967-1973) and Sulfur magazine (1981-2000).
 
Most recently, in 2012 Black Widow published The Price of Experience, a large compendium of his poetry and prose, and in the spring of 2013 Wesleyan brought out his co-translation with Arnold of Césaire's original 1939 Notebook of a Return to the Native Land. Also in the fall of 2013, Ugly Duckling Presse published his translation of José Antonio Mazzotti's Sakra Boccata. In 2014, Black Widow will bring out Clayton Eshleman: The Whole Art, edited by Stuart Kendall, a large collection of new and classic essays on the author's life as a poet, translator, and editor, andPenetralia, a new collection of poems. Clayton continues to live with his wife Caryl in Ypsilanti, Michigan. His website is www.claytoneshleman.com 
 
 
 
Book Information:
 
· Paperback: 28 pages
· Binding: Perfect-Bound
· Publisher: BlazeVOX [books]
· ISBN: 978-1-60964-163-4
 
$10
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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The Complete Dark Shadows (of My Childhood) by Tony Trigilio Now Available!

 Tony Trigilio’s book-length poem The Complete Dark Shadows (of My Childhood) is the first book of a multi-volume experiment in autobiography. For this project, Trigilio is watching all 1,225 episodes of Dark Shadows, the gothic soap opera that ran on ABC from 1966-1971. He is composing one sentence for each episode and shaping the sentences into couplets. Book 1 covers 183 episodes. The Complete Dark Shadows (of My Childhood) is both an autobiographical diary poem and an ode to lost television artifacts. As David Trinidad, author of Peyton Place: A Haiku Soap Opera, writes of the book, “Trigilio manages to create a riveting two-fold narrative—personal and TV-screen ekphrastic—out of piecemeal sentences (one per episode) that honor the most unlikely of poetic subjects: a cheaply produced, blooper-ridden, gothic-horror soap opera.

Barnabas Collins, kitsch vampire but source of poet Tony Trigilio’s childhood nightmares, rises from his casket in the first sentence of this intrepid fever chart of a poem. Trigilio manages to create a riveting two-fold narrative—personal and TV-screen ekphrastic—out of piecemeal sentences (one per episode) that honor the most unlikely of poetic subjects: a cheaply produced, blooper-ridden, gothic-horror soap opera. This is just the first installment of what promises to be a classic American coffin-shaped (I hope) epic poem. —David Trinidad

Tony Trigilio has taken on an epic task in The Complete Dark Shadows (of My Childhood). Here, in Book 1, Trigilio uses the episodes as touchstones for his earliest memories, including nightmares, brought on by TV’s dream factory. Watching Dark Shadows episodes on DVD almost fifty years later, alone or with friends, the speaker confesses, “each time I rewind, it’s something different.” He re-casts his past in terms of gruesome camp, excavation and repression. As I read through this poem I remember my outrage at Dark Shadows being preempted by Watergate coverage, the weird day the show went from black and white to color. But if Trigilio seems to be in the zeitgeist—Dark Shadows remade by Tim Burton, Dark Shadows as referenced in Mad Men—he is also solidly planted in the universal. A boy and his mother, his brother, his father. The spirit and death. Blood—as in relation. Blood as in sex and violence. Couplets (rhyming and not), anaphora, elegies, sonnets, and a ghazal beautifully frame personal and cultural anxiety. —Denise Duhamel

Long before Twilight or True Blood, there was Barnabas Collins haunting the national psyche—a vampire the poet Tony Trigilio met before he met language itself, through watching the Dark Shadows soap as a very young child with his mother. In this tour-de-force of a long poem, Trigilio reveals how our pop culture invades the very core of our imagination with irresistible magical images such as ghost girls, psychic boys, “sea tramps,” and “paranormal flowers” of all varieties. But what he also shows is that while (to paraphrase Wittgenstein) “our pictures hold us captive,” we can repossess them and ourselves through our creative acts. Anyone who wants to understand what’s behind our cultural obsession with vampires better get this book right away. —Jerome Sala

Tony Trigilio’s recent books are White Noise (Apostrophe Books) and Historic Diary (BlazeVOX [books]). He is editor of Elise Cowen: Poems and Fragments, forthcoming in 2014 from Ahsahta Press. He directs the program in Creative Writing/Poetry at Columbia College Chicago and is a co-founder and co-editor of Court Green.

Book Information:

 

· Paperback: 102 pages

· Binding: Perfect-Bound

· Publisher: BlazeVOX [books] 

· ISBN: 978-1-60964-143-6

 

$16 

 
 
 
 
 

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some deer left the yard moving day by Andrew K. Peterson Now Available!

some deer left the yard moving day by Andrew K. Peterson Now Available!

 

 To: “quincify.” To: “decolonize.” Andy's Peterson's some deer is dedicated to “Naropa,” the university he attended for two years. There, he drew rancid, ebullient comics and amazed us all – his “blood company” – with stand-up, improvised accounts and physical examples of a contemporary hybrid poetics. As Oscar Wilde said, “There is no such thing as spontaneity.” I always understood this to mean that the person who improvises the best [Andy Peterson] is also the person who has enough time inside them that, when prompted, it [time] can come out. By “time,” I mean that unique combination of dream-soaked inner life and scholarship that – in Peterson's work – is the capacity to move between a “lit dusk,” “its rituals,” and the “cheerful madness” that a life in community brings. The experiment is to stay alive. In the words of the author himself via Creeley [quoted] [voltage]: “Poets don’t invent the world (they live it).” They: “Forget to ask but remember to release via kisses.” And so on. I can't decide. Is this book a “waterfall” or is it a “volcano”? Or is it, as the Buddhist saying goes: “Both-both.” Both things at once.


– Bhanu Kapil

some deer left the yard moving day is a book of many different kinds of love. It is an engendering room wherein we can ask (and are asked) what it means to be human (“stripped bare, griev[ing] for the weakened white cells”). The thing that I find especially miraculous is that this book lives on in the body like herbs do after intake. I ate some stolen, large-leafed basil today and even when I am not looking directly at it anymore, even when I am not pondering it, it continues nourishing from within. This book feels very much like Naropa to me: the incense wafts forging their way up the figures sitting zazen, the chipping bricks and ivy, the turning of envy into compassionate states.


– jj hastain

Once in a while, some poems come along that exude American enthusiasm and disaster: “oi hawk-swirl, / oi pale blue / beast devour.” In these poems, Peterson rides onward, outward into horizon and hope and wreckage. Moving Day is made up of structurally juxtaposing serial movements that simultaneously project and deconstruct a poetics of American hospitality, possibility and variation. Conceptualism and sincerity, joy and grief, superimpositions of frames of architectures of sound of collage of derivation radiate imagination over repression. Some Deer is a practice of transforming calamity into a path, echoing, going, fathoming geography of unyielding historical relationship. Read these poems and make marvelous the new-old, “sunflower / your power animal.” Be complicit and harbor intricate lyric conspiracy. Follow these symbolic deer into freedom, risk, danger and dream. Watch the bright heart sparks rise. And together, with Peterson, break out into an OUT THERE, becoming, here, a place, when, now, we’re leaving again, to get to, now, here, again.


– Jared Hayes


Andrew K. Peterson’s poetry publications include karaoke lipsync opera (White Sky Press, 2012), Museum of Thrown Objects (BlazeVOX, 2010), bonjour meriwether and the rabid maps (Equinox Chapbook Contest runner up, Fact-Simile Press 2011), and two collaborative chapbooks with the word ‘here’ in the titles: Here Come the Groovies (with Joseph Cooper), and Between Here and the Telescopes (with Elizabeth Guthrie). He edits the online journal summer stock, and lives in Massachusetts.


Book Information:

· Paperback: 100 pages


· Binding: Perfect-Bound


· Publisher: BlazeVOX [books] 


· ISBN: 978-1-60964-130-6

$16

Some Deer Left the Yard Moving Day by Andrew K. Peterson Book Preview 

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