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Dear You by Wade Stevenson Reviewed by Kirkus!

 Stevenson’s (Flutes and Tomatoes, 2015, etc.) latest collection offers 27 emotionally intense poems about his struggle with the end of a short but passionate relationship.

This memoir, made up primarily of poems, charts the author’s painful journey through the stages of grief—including a desperate search for answers, bargaining, blame, and anger. It details his relationship with the pseudonymous Mlle. X in the prologue essay, in which he tells of how he fatefully met her just after his first marriage ended. At the time, he was living in an apartment building that he owned in Buffalo, New York. Mlle. X was one of his tenants, and they quickly became lovers. A pregnancy and marriage followed, but then their intimacy deteriorated. In “Even the Dead Can Feel,” he tells of how the yearning and loneliness of being in a loveless marriage began eating away at him: “It’s while she’s asleep that my rage / Builds to a fiery crescendo that has no place to go / But to collapse hopelessly upon itself, an inert reminder / Of its own impotence.” After she leaves him, he shows how rage turned to despair in “Getting the Message,” a heart-rending poem about coming to grips with the end of a relationship: “One of these days I’m going to lose it, / Put a gun to my head and end the waking dream.” At the conclusion of the sequence of poems, the author relates how he found a kind of balance and rhythm in his life in “the light you left behind.” Overall, this collection lays bare the complexity of the tortured emotions of love lost. Along the way, it offers up revelations of how even the most painful endings can lead to new beginnings.

A brutally honest free-verse collection.

Read the whole review here 

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This Visit by Susan Lewis reviewed by McKenzie Lynn Tozan

 Susan Lewis holds a lovely command of rhythm, sound, and the weird possibilities that enter our relationships and life events. Whether we are reading her prose poems, like “This is Not a Movie” or “Dig,” or we are admiring the line breaks and white space of her linear poems in This Visit, we are always thinking about our connection to the narrator and the imposed distance from everyone, and everything, else, reflecting that same isolation
Susan Lewis_This Visitwe may observe when moving through our own lives and being aware of our impact on others, and their impact on us. I found these poems to be wildly interesting and thought-provoking, and they have stayed with me for weeks since I closed these three books and left them on my desk until I could review them. Sometimes a writer will do something in their work that gets a tight hold on me, and Lewis’s ability to surprise me through the narrator’s reactions to average goings-on (the digging, the hunter’s gear) has such a tight hold on me, and I don’t want it to let go. These images are so vivid and, cliché or not, leap off of the page and challenge my perceptions. Whether you are struggling like I was to find time to read and enjoy, or if you are simply looking for the next book to buy for your shelves, get your shovels and travel gear ready, and look Susan Lewis up. I am so happy to say that I picked such an excellent writer to turn to for my first day back to reading and reviewing books, and I’m sure, with not the slightest sliver of doubt in my mind, that you’ll enjoy her work, too, and become haunted by it. 

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Anis Shivani to be interviewed on Pacifica Radio thursday!


Anis Shivani will be hosted on Houston' s Pacifica radio station's Living Arts show this Thursday evening from 6 pm to 7 pm kpft 90.1 discussing his new book, Whatever Speaks on Behalf of Hashish. Do tune in!

Check out his book here

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A review of Failure Lyric by Kristina Marie Darling has been published at Sabotage Reviews

 Hurray! A new review of Failure Lyric by Kristina Marie Darling has been published at Sabotage Reviews:



Failure Lyric by Kristina Marie Darling

– Reviewed by Angelina D’Roza –

The first night I was iced out of the city […] At my feet, shattered glass. The finch’s broken neck. I just sat there, counting the dirty feathers, its cracked bones. The dead bird said nothing


In Failure Lyric, an affecting image is crystallized through Kristina Marie Darling’s direct language, all downright sharp edges. The broken bird, and the speaker, who can’t look away, could easily symbolise the death of a marriage, say something about numb inertia, isolation, the strange ways through which the end of a relationship alters your focus, throws perspective. But that would be a bit too easy. Failure Lyric works because it’s cumulative: images recur, stories are told, retold, told again, remembered and misremembered. Reality is destablised: what we thought we knew about what’s gone before is rewritten in the face of the present, forcing us to experience the loss of the past we thought we had. The dead bird image, though beautiful, would be almost clumsy if it weren’t so well woven into a whole that’s unravelling.

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Kit Robinson, Aaron Simon, Alan Bernheimer, and Patrick Marks. A great evening! Poets Aaron Simon & Kit Robinson Read from their New Books at The Green Arcade Introduced by Alan Bernheimer


Kit Robinson, Aaron Simon, Alan Bernheimer, and Patrick Marks. A great evening! 

Poets Aaron Simon & Kit Robinson Read from their New Books at The Green Arcade on Friday. They were introduced by Alan Bernheimer. Hurray! 

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