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Ubermutter's Death Dance by Laura Hinton Now Available!

Übermütter's Death Dance is a mixed-genre poetry series recounting a mother's experience of an adult child's death. Beginning with reportorial poet's prose, the book dissolves into a series of lyric pieces that incorporate song fragments and scripted movement into written text. Memoir-like surreal prose tales lace together multiple modalities of poetry into a script that creates and re-creates the "Übermütter"—a pluralized figure—into repeating but evolving reconstructions of grieving "selves." These are performance "selves" that appear and reappear, as reflected in the disembodied sightings that also distill this book's deeper exploration of matter through 3-D figuration. Interweaving multicultural historical-spiritual texts with literary and psychological accounts of death and dying, this hybrid poetry work provides space for words that mirror the grieving body, for a body that mirrors back the spatially moving text.

"There is no way to make sense of a senseless death, but in Übermütter's Death Dance, Laura Hinton engages the senses to stay alive and to find, if not meaning, then some sort of vital force in the midst of tragedy. Hinton’s heterogeneous yet unified collection combines the rhetoric of documentation and daily life with the lyricism of dreams, visions and ritual. The result is profound, moving and mercurial."

—Joanna Fuhrman, author of The Year of Yellow Butterflies


"How do we survive grief—let alone write it? Shattered by the inexplicable death of her only child at 32, Laura Hinton miraculously gives us this lacerating work of witness. “am I still a mother?” she asks, refusing any answer. Her voice is at once desperate and wise, knowing that no one wants to live in these pages: “I / breathe on you / my Death / contagion,” she quips—“I am un-home / d.” And because in grief “time does not exist,” sequence reverses, halts, disappears: “no future tense in morning time,” “there is no ‘after.’” In the shifting landscapes and timescapes of Hinton’s work, memory and dream, lived and imagined experience, coalesce in the dissociation anyone who has mourned will recognize. I feel privileged to read—to be—in these words."

—Elisabeth Frost, author of The Feminist Avant-Garde in American Poetry


"Laura Hinton’s heartbreakingly beautiful elegy to her son Paul, Übermütter's Death Dance, is a thrilling choreography of lyric, memoir, dance, spirituality and theory. In this book, Hinton assembles a profound reflection about motherhood, death and love. Indeed, the reader dances throughout this mother’s life and death dance, leaping and soaring from one gorgeously written section to the next."

—Karen Brennan, author of little dark

Laura Hinton is a multi-media poet, scholar, editor and literary critic based in New York City. Her scholarly books include The Perverse Gaze of Sympathy: Sadomasochistic Sentiments from Clarissa to Rescue 911 (SUNY Press), and two edited collections on women's poetics: Jayne Cortez, Adrienne Rich, and the Feminist Superhero: Voice, Vision, Politics, and Performance in U.S. Contemporary Women's Poetics (Lexington Books) and We Who Love to Be Astonished: Experimental Women’s Writing and Performance Poetics (co-editor with Cynthia Hogue, University of Alabama Press). She has published a poetry book, Sisyphus My Love (To Record a Dream in a Bathtub) (BlazeVox Books), and many independent hybrid poetry pieces including photography and/or video in journals like Yew, Madhatter Review, Feminist Studies, and Poetryseen. She publishes critical essays on literature and film in journals like Textual Practice and Jacket 2, and has also published creative non-fiction essays, most recently in The Intima. She is the editor of a performance chapbook series under the imprint of Mermaid Tenement Press, and has kept a literary blog of essays on hybrid poetics since 2009, entitled, Chant de la Sirene. Laura Hinton is a Professor of English at the City College of New York (CUNY), where she teaches women's literature, contemporary poetics, visual studies and feminist theory. Her website is located at www.laurahinton-singingsirens.com.

Book Information:

· Paperback: 124 pages

· Binding: Perfect-Bound

· Publisher: BlazeVOX [books] 

· ISBN: 978-1-60964-241-9

$16


Also see: Sisyphus My Love by Laura Hinton

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Übermütter's Death Dance by Laura Hinton Book Preview

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Moon Talk by Wade Stevenson is reviewed by Green Life Blue Water!!

 

Moon Talk

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Moon Talk

For centuries, the moon has captivated our imagination, influenced our bodies, and penetrated our dreams in all her evanescent, full and mysterious glory. Moon Talk, by Wade Stevenson pays a metaphorical tribute to the golden glowing orb whose raw, ubiquitous power can sway the tides, and dances like the moon herself between the dark and light, the fixed and fungible, a chiaroscuro of our favorite heavenly body.

Read the Whole Review here  

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Puddles of an Open by Paige Melin Now Available!

 Charles Bernstein once argued that in a well-crafted poem, form acts as an extension of content, particularly as the subject of the work is enacted through the behavior of the language itself. Paige Melin’s writing not only utilizes hybrid forms to mirror content, but rather, form and content become seamlessly intertwined as the book unfolds. We as readers are invited into the heroine’s psyche, made to experience the beauty and terror of thought itself. Through her provocative syntactic ruptures and stream-of-consciousess narrative style, Melin subtly and gracefully interrogates the boundaries between interior and exterior, subject and object, self and world. Puddles of an Open is a stunning debut, as innovative in its technique as it is in its philosophical assertions.

—Kristina Marie Darling


Paige Melin’s literary laboratorial imaginations, Puddles of an Open, moves to expose the sociological prejudice and the political capacity inherent in dictionary words as they, these things of letters, are casually exchanged between us. Her assemblages are ensembles of a harmonious breach with the quotidian and sublime suburban poem of our time. In Melin’s ruptured poetry, compliant poetry becomes poetry of applied use, and with hope, a poetic tool for reassignment.

—Michael Basinski


[cant enter or move out of away from]  Puddles of an Open occurs in a suggestively uncomfortable space between entrance and exit that is never fully within. about to be said and already retracted, Melin’s suspended [story] remains untold: as it resists coherence as representation of events, it captures instead a self-fragmenting fugitiveness in articulation. raising awareness around speaking and narration as decision – precisely by refusing this decision – Melin plays on the slipperiness of memory and the language of telling [eyes] [ice] while lingering on aporias of consent, admission, desire, and feeling besetting the underlying matters spoken of. is this a trauma or a dream (or both)? whose words are in whose mouth? [funny to awaken when youve never been sleeping] come skim with Melin along this uneven surface: seduction is a text that doesn’t give up (its secrets)…

—Judith Goldman


Poet, editor, and intersectional feminist Paige Melin is currently pursuing her M.A. in English at the University of Maine. Her writing has been published in NAME, Yellowfield, and Stolen Island, and has won awards through the Academy of American Poets and the Albert Cook, Mac Hammond, and John Logan Prize for Poetry. Along with her partner, Vincent, she co-founded and edits steel bellow: a purely Buffalo literary magazine, and she is currently the Editorial Assistant for Paideuma: Modern and Contemporary Poetry and Poetics.


Book Information:

· Paperback: 36 pages

· Binding: Perfect-Bound

· Publisher: BlazeVOX [books] 

· ISBN: 978-1-60964-236-5

$10

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Puddles of an Open by Paige Melin Book Preview

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Those Godawful Streets of Man by Stephen Bett reviewed in Pacific Rim Review of Books (10th Anniversary Edition)

 

Those Godawful Streets of Man by Stephen Bett
reviewed in Pacific Rim Review of Books (10th Anniversary Edition)
Reviewed by Richard Stevenson


I love what Stephen Bett is doing with language in his latest opus. I call it word jazz: poetry generated as much by sound association as image association; what Charles Olson called Projective Verse—proprioceptive poetry that lives in the moment and leaps playfully through word association nets not so much to create a thing, as to arrest the movement of the mind as it moves through microcosms and macrocosms of the cityscape, reflecting on and refracting what the poet finds.

Let me lay my cards out. I’ve been in a long love affair with English language haikai poetry (haiku, senryu, tanka, kyoka, zappai, renku); Kerouacian “pops” and Ginsberg’s “American Sentences”; trad to avant garde ‘ku; imagism; found poetry; realist and neosurrealist styles. So, after a bout of jazz poetry and performance in homage to Miles Davis, and performing cryptocritter/alien poems at kidlit conferences and local bandshell/gazebos (Frank Zappa for Tweens) with my jazz/rock troupe Sasquatch, I’ve been getting low and digging wit, irony, humour, epiphanies, bumper snicker spam-ku, scifaiku, for a good ten years or more.

Hence, I love the paradox of the so-called “wordless poem,” erasure, minimalism in all its modes, modern and post-modern. Bett’s his own man here. He’s absorbed the lessons of Donald Allen’s New American poets—the Objectivists, Beats, Black Mountain, New York and San Francisco schools, etc.; the Canadian Tish poets’ experiments with vernacular phonological phrasing in open form; the studious avoidance of the “burnished urn” Modernist reliance on myth, metaphor, and intellectual conceits, dense allusion, tight boxed containers.

Not that Bett’s poems aren’t marvelously allusive; the bric-à-brac of pop culture is all here: movies, cell phones, the Web, selfies, Tweets and all manner of squawks from the Interface. But there is nothing overtly confessional and the stitches and strophes are as comfortable and companionable as a Tetley Tea bag or
new silk pyramid of the latest craft tea. The allusions are to pop culture events: post-modern texts, not obscure texts. The reader is invited in—to squalid coldwater flats of yesteryear newly converted for the addicted and down-and-out of the lower east side of Vancouver, with sparking bare wires spitting between poles, maybe—but, no matter: the urban experience touches everyone and the reader will supply his or her own meta-narratives where the minimalist directive of the poet’s overarching narrative allows.

This is minimalism for readers who like their poems fat: rich, but sans impasto or ornament. A book of raw wire in the city: edgy, tense, sharp, angular, dangerous— in the electrified, computerized grids of cityscape we inhabit, and in the boxes we place each other in and peer out from; pole to pole down the dirty low-rent boulevard, in back alleys, out to suburbia, as we attempt to touch through wires and wireless interfaces, en face, live and in person in an age of celebrity cast-off culture and relationships.


At the heart of the book and appearing late in the accumulating narrative—the overall alienation we 21st-century zombie citizens feel facing globalization and its feral children—is the story of a dissolving relationship, the man too earnest and accepting; the woman raging and fading into madness. But nothing is cloying or mawkish or sentimental, or even confessional; instead we shift easily from a sort of Special Victims Unit episode of macro family skeleton news:


Then there was cousin
Billy (Edinburg)
down the shop for smokes
Wife and baby daughter
at home for five
minutes


READ THE WHOLE REVIEW in the Pacific Rim Review of Books (10th Anniversary Edition)

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Nectar of Story: Poems by Tim J. Myers won a 2016 Storytelling World Resource Award

 

Category 7 

Special Storytelling Resources : Honor

The 2016 Storytelling World Resource Awards


This section features the 2016 winners and honors selected from the numerous nominated stories, books, and recordings. Beneath each award title is a short descriptive phrase about the resource contents. The major evaluative criterion was "story- listener appeal" for the items selected in Categories 1-6, and "usefulness for storytellers" for the resources honored in Category 7. 


Read more here 


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Photos on flickr