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Susan Lewis interviewed in Words in Place

 

Interview with Susan Lewis: Is it Poetry, Prose Poem, or Flash?


Susan Lewis lives in New York City and edits Posit. She is the author of How to be Another (Červená Barva Press, 2014), State of the Union(Spuyten Duyvil Press, 2014), The Following Message (White Knuckle Press, 2013), At Times Your Lines(Argotist Ebooks, 2012), Some Assembly Required (Dancing Girl Press, 2011), Commodity Fetishism, winner of the 2009 Červená Barva Press Chapbook Award, and Animal Husbandry (Finishing Line Press, 2008).
Gay Degani: I've read many of your poems – especially your prose poems – but before we get started with discussing that subject, I thought my first question should be more about you, for me and the readers to get to know you. Can you tell me a little more about what brought you to writing? I noticed from your extended biography that you went to law school. Being a lawyer means lots and lots of writing, did that play any part in your decision to turn to writing?

Susan Lewis: It’s true that law involves plenty of writing – and reading. That was probably why I thought I might be better suited to the field than I was! I’d been a bookworm since I was tiny: a bit sickly, I was always reading. I was also taken all over the world (school be damned!) by my parents, who were globe-trotting Hollywood producers – and spent a lot of time in planes, trains, cars, and hotel rooms – reading. 

By the time I was a teenager I had powered through the canon. As for writing, when I was six or seven, I fell in love with a slim volume of poems by Basho, and started writing Haiku, Tanka, etc. I kept writing poetry, plays, and short stories until I went to college, where I studied – and therefore wrote – literature and film criticism. After which I wanted to be “relevant” and “engaged” in social justice – hence my foray into law. The fact is law taught me plenty about discipline and accuracy. But it was not a great fit. I’m no warrior – I’ve always loathed competition. And intellectually, I’m more intuitive than methodical, preferring insight to argumentation, implication to explication.
Read the whole interview here
Preview Susan's forthcoming book, This Visit here 
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Two fine reviews of Kristina Marie Darling's Requited

Two fine reviews of Kristina Marie Darling's Requited

 Book Review: Kristina Marie Darling's Requited
by Georgia Kreiger
In her characteristic style, Kristina Marie Darling blurs the already tenuous lines we draw between literary genres in her book Requited. Composed of a series of thirteen prose poems appended by an epilogue consisting of fragmented images, the book is defined by Darling as a work of fiction and includes the conventional disclaimer regarding coincidental resemblance to actual people and events. A concluding note reveals that lines are borrowed from two primary texts.   These authorial remarks prompt us to search for a narrative progression in a book that is simultaneously poetry, prose, and fiction, and that, like an academic essay, includes synthesized material from primary sources.  




Read more at Split Lip Magazine here

Preview or Buy a copy of Requited here 
The Infoxicated Corner: Lisa M. Cole Reviews Kristina Marie Darling’s ‘Requited’

 
Requited: Poetry as a Truth-Telling Mechanism

The effectiveness of Kristina Marie Darling’s book Requited lies in its ability to remind readers that it is human nature to crave to be what we are not. To crave what we don’t have. Darling treats poetry as a truth-telling mechanism. This is a book that is aware of itself, its truths, and how it wants to tell them. The self-referential nature of this text urges the truth to make itself known. It enables the use of poetry as a truth-telling device, and reminds the reader of fundamental truths.

The book is the chronicle of a couple’s relationship, and their eventual parting. We begin the story in a garden, which might be a nod toward to the Garden of Eden, and what it symbolizes for us: a clean slate; new beginnings; fresh starts. Gardens and forests are so richly associated in Western literature with emotional truths, and the unfettered psyche. This trope was a clever one to utilize for the story of a romantic relationship because this draw that humans have toward the new, the fresh, the undiscovered, is what makes new relationships so intoxicating, but it is also what makes the end of relationships so difficult, because in breaking up with someone we acknowledge that a part of our innocence has been irrevocably lost.

Read more at The The Magazine here

Preview or Buy a copy of Requited here 

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Such Conjunctions: Robert Duncan, Jess, and Alberto de Lacerda Now Available!

                        “In the mysteries of human paths, such conjunctions!”

                                                —Robert Duncan, “A PrePreface for Alberto” (1977)

 

After meeting in November 1969 at the International Festival of Poetry in Austin, Texas, the Portuguese poet Alberto de Lacerda (1928-2007) developed a trans-Atlantic friendship with the San Francisco poet Robert Duncan (1919-1988) and his partner, the artist Jess (1923-2004). This book celebrates that friendship by bringing together from the Duncan and de Lacerda archives reproductions and transcriptions of all their extant correspondence in addition to the many inscribed publications, books, magazines, photographs, poems, drawings, and artwork that they shared with each other. Together, these items document not only the story of the relationship between these three men, including their subsequent visits together in San Francisco, Boston, and London, but also many of the significant events in each figure’s life during the years 1969 to 1989. Edited by Mary Porter de Sousa and Luís Amorim de Sousa, de Lacerda’s longtime friend and literary executor, and James Maynard, Associate Curator of the University at Buffalo’s Poetry Collection, which houses Duncan’s papers, this collection features essays by de Sousa, Maynard, and Scott Laughlin, a former student of de Lacerda’s.

Book Information:

 

· Paperback: 110 pages

· Binding: Perfect-Bound

· Publisher: BlazeVOX [books] 

· ISBN:  978-1-60964-167-2

 

$28

 

 
 
 

Such Conjunctions- Robert Duncan, Jess, And Alberto de Lacerda Book Preview

 

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Tony Trigilio reads at The University of Kansas

 

Visiting poet writes of vampires, aliens, Lee Harvey Oswald

Thu, 09/18/2014


LAWRENCE — Tony Trigilio’s poems tell stories about alien abductions, vampiric soap operas and Kennedy-assassination conspiracy theories. Trigilio, a professor of creative writing at Columbia College Chicago, will read from his work at 4 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 2, in the English Room of the Kansas Union. The reading is free and open to the public. There will be a question-and-answer period afterward, and then Trigilio will be on hand to sign copies of his books. For his latest project, the poet is watching all 1,225 episodes of the 1960s horror soap opera “Dark Shadows.” As a child, Trigilio says, “I slept with my shoulders hunched to ward off vampires” as a result of watching the show daily with his mother. He calls the project “a gigantic experiment in poetry and autobiography” as well as “an act of radical endurance.” The first installment of his project, “The Complete Dark Shadows (of My Childhood), Book 1,” was recently released. His previous book, “White Noise,” collages words from Don DeLillo’s 1985 novel of the same name with Internet chatter from the 2000s. His work in progress deals with the alleged UFO abduction of Betty and Barney Hill in 1961.

“I think [Trigilio] is one of the most versatile writers in the U.S. today,” said Joseph Harrington, professor of post-1900 American poetry in the Department of English. “He’s stretching not only poetry, but narrative as well. His books have various forms, voices and topics. You never know what he’ll do next.”

Trigilio is also the author of “Historic Diary,” and the critical work “Allen Ginsberg’s Buddhist Poetics.” He is editor of the journal Court Green, producer of the podcast “Radio Free Albion” and is drummer for the Chicago-based band Pet Theories.

The event is part of the English department MFA program’s Visiting Writers Series.

For more information, contact Joe Harrington, 785/424-3556 or jharrington@ku.edu.

 

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Reflections of Hostile Revelries by Jennifer C. Wolfe Reviewed in Savay Verse and Wit

 

Reflections of Hostile Revelries by Jennifer C. Wolfe


Source: Poet Jennifer C. Wolfe
Paperback, 108 pages
 

Reflections of Hostile Revelries: A Collection of Political Poetry Musings by Jennifer C. Wolfe is another collection of political poetry ripped from the headlines, as the narrator comments on the mistakes made by our political leaders and political campaigns gone wrong.  These poems read more like critical essays, rather than verse, using a narrative prose style that grabs a headline and picks it apart with a fine-toothed comb to unveil the unsupported facts of today’s political platforms and the flip-flopping of candidates eager to please the masses.  She covers topics ranging from immigration enforcement to the “nanny” state laws, and some of these poems are hilarious in their re-appropriation of pop culture.

Read the whole review here

Explore this book here

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Photos on flickr