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Articles by Clarice Waldman :

Some Cars from Three Plays by Deborah Meadows performed in LA

 

“Some Cars” was originally performed at the MorYork Gallery in Los Angeles October 29, 2015. Directed by Juli Crockett.

Cast:

Driver: Juli Crockett
Passenger: Shaughn Buchholz
Poet: Gray Palmer
Man: Brian Tichnell
Woman: Shayne Eastin
Game Warden: Brian Tichnell
Game Warden’s father: Patrick Moore
Game Warden’s son: Christian Gibbs
Two Clowns: Tom (in academic robes): Shaughn Buchholz
and Jerry (in revolutionary’s garments): Shayne Eastin

Guy Zimmerman, Artistic Director and Producer; Suzanna Storm, Associate Producer; Bill Ballou, Technical Director; John Zalewski, Sound Design; Ellie Rabinowitz, Lighting; Patrick Halm, Props; Melissa Fiociello, Set Design; Amanda Eno, Stage Manager.

Read more on Three Plays by Deborah Meadows here 

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Fire For Thought by Reed Bye Now Available!

The mind may move faster than the hand can write but Reed Bye’s poems capture the dictates of thought as processed by the conspiratorial and wandering eye, all the light and shadow of the natural world, the peripheral glimpses of people and places where few poets ever go. Lucid, abstract, impulsive, beyond the pale—Fire For Thought is both a summing up and a starting over—“what seems to be necessity,” and something much more.

—Lewis Warsh

Reed Bye's meditations on meditation open out into lovely Hopkinsesque melodies. There's a clarity here spawned from questions about inside and outside, mind and body, and who we are as humans in our landscapes.

—Lisa Jarnot


Reed Bye lives in Boulder, Colorado with his wife, Jill Jones. He has published ten collections of poetry and two albums of original songs. He recently retired after many years on the core faculty of the Jack Kerouac School at Naropa University, where he taught poetry writing workshops and courses in classic and contemporary literary studies, and contemplative poetics.


Book Information:

· Paperback: 68 pages

· Binding: Perfect-Bound

· Publisher: BlazeVOX [books] 

· ISBN: 978-1-60964-234-1

$12

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Fire for Thought by Reed Bye Book Preview

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Tim J. Myers talks with Rachelle Escamilla on SoundCloud



Listen to TIm's talk with Rachelle Escamilla on Sound Cloud here: 

https://soundcloud.com/rachelle-escamilla/tim-j-myers-oct2015


Tim J. Myers is a writer, songwriter, storyteller, and senior lecturer at Santa Clara University. His children’s books have won recognition from the New York Times, NPR, and the Smithsonian. He’s published over 130 poems, won a first prize in a poetry contest judged by John Updike, has three books of adult poetry out and a nonfiction book on fatherhood, and won a major prize in science fiction. He won the West Coast Songwriters Saratoga Chapter Song of the Year and the 2012 SCBWI Magazine Merit Award for Fiction. Find him at www.TimMyersStorySong.com or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/TimJMyers1.

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All Beautiful And Useless by C. Kubasta Reviewed at Pith

  

A review of All Beautiful & Useless by C. Kubasta
by Stacy Cartledge

Kubasta-Cov-lg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C. Kubasta, All Beautiful & Useless. New York: BlazeVox, 2015. 104 pp.

 

It’s not until the penultimate poem of C. Kubasta’s first full-length collection that we
learn the book’s title, All Beautiful & Useless, comes from a description of “a roadkill
doe” and her “twin fawns.” While the image may echo Stafford’s “Traveling through
the Dark,” Kubasta engages in a different comparison—but more on that later.
Kubasta’s nascent deer wind up bottled in formaldehyde for high school science
students to study. In taking this particular description for the collection’s title, she
indicates that her poems are like these fawns: beautiful & horrifying, fascinating &
fragmented, compelling yet malleable objects d’étude.

She’s not wrong.

Take, for example, Kubasta’s continuing gestures towards the epic. The book is divided
into three sections, each with its own set of poems, yet these poems collude with one
another, picking up previous motifs at unexpected moments and connecting
conversations that the reader realizes only in retrospect are still continuing. Because
she wants these poems to accomplish so much, there are some occasional slides into
indulgence, but one must admire Kubasta’s brazenness, which stops short of hubris yet
allows her to appropriate at will, to use any genre, voice, or technique towards her
purpose. I’m thinking here especially of some noteworthy structural choices made in
the last three poems of the book’s first section: a modified sonnet set (“A Consideration
of Whether Time is Tensed or Tense-less” & “To What Degree Past, Present and
Future is Equally Real”) and a genre-bending piece, “Sweetbitter,” a poem in
screenplay format in which the poem being in screenplay format is one of its topics.
This piece in particular articulates a central tension in Kubatsa’s work:

The problem is the poet is always
the subject of the poem. Always,
even when (especially then)
purportedly not.

 

The dilemma is a real one, and there is no doubt in the verdict Kubasta renders here. I
can’t disagree, either (though I don’t necessarily concur that the verdict should be
quite so liberating). Turning back to the rest of part one with this artistic principle in
mind, we see just how Kubasta’s voice interweaves—sometimes echoing, sometimes
juxtaposing, sometimes paralleling—that of nine-year-old Elizabeth Parris, accuser of
witches in Salem and daughter of that town’s Reverend. Kubasta also speaks to and of
her own father in this multipart poem, which considers itself an act that invites a
declaration of war (“Casus Belli”). It may seem fitting, then, that there are military-style
redactions in the section dealing with the father. One could be forgiven for assuming
them to be simple artifice, the thick black line a gimmick rather than a true redaction.
However, it should be known that this is not the case. As I am reviewing the
manuscript in its galley proof (the book was published the first week of September
2015, after I accepted the assignment), I received the manuscript in electronic form—
twice, in fact, and I think erroneously. In one draft, the redacted passages are not
blacked out. I won’t violate the poet’s wishes, but I will say I disagree with the decision
to eliminate so much material. The speaker’s assertion that there are stories that could
be told does not approach the power of the stories themselves in developing the
father’s character and the daughter’s relationship to him. When she says, “I’m afraid
he will ask me questions and I will tell the truth,” the redactions inform the reader that
it won’t be the whole truth.

This speaker who holds back is hard to reconcile with the one from the book’s second
and third sections, who unflinchingly examines the monstrosity of childhood sexual
abuse and the horrors of serial killer Ed Gein (the true-life template for Hitchcock’s
Norman Bates) with such nuance and honesty that it becomes a kind of compassion. In
allowing compelling beauty to be ascertained from horrendous acts, she elicits from
the reader time and again a response as profound and powerful as any I have ever felt
from a reading experience.



Read the whole review here



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Failure Lyric by Kristina Marie Darling reviewed at Tweetspeak

In Failure Lyric, Kristina Marie Darling uses the prose poem form to address grief in relatively short selections. Her use of imagery is strong—how she describes various cities, sad movies as metaphors, and remembering places of meetings highlighting the relationships’ decline and end.

Here, in “Saint Wife,” she describes the moment when the second partner recognizes that the relationship is over.

Saint Wife

At first, you didn’t quite understand. How I carried all that grief from city to city, until it turned into an enormous white halo around my head.

And the stars. The way they followed my sadness, rising and falling like an ocean. Before long, even the cities where we lived began to circle around my melancholy, each one a thread spinning through the eye of a needle.

One morning, you woke and noticed that the world around you moved differently. The freeway no longer led to the subway station. And the flower stand wasn’t where you remembered it.

You cried, but neither one of us could change it back.

Failure LyricDarling has published more than 20 collections of poetry and hybrid prose, including The Sun & The Moon and The Arctic Circle. She’s been recognized with a Yaddo residency, a Hawthornden Castle Fellowship, and a Visiting Artist Fellowship from the American Academy in Rome, and received numerous artist-in-residence fellowships from numerous institutions. Honors include the Dan Liberthson Prize from the Academy of American Poets and nominations for several other awards. She received degrees in English Literature and American Culture Studies from Washington University, and an M.A. in Philosophy from the University of Missouri. She’s is currently working toward a Ph.D. in Poetics at S.U.N.Y.-Buffalo.

One doesn’t necessarily expect the prose poem form to add beauty to the subject of grief, but that’s what Failure Lyric accomplishes.

Read the whole review here

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Photos on flickr