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Archive for February 2015

This Visit by Susan Lewis reviewed at Red Paint Hill

 

A Glimpse into our Alien World:  Susan Lewis and This Visit

 Susan Lewis
This Visit

BlazeVOX [books]
Buffalo, NY
© 2014
ISBN:  978-1-60964-169-6

 PURCHASE

Astonishment. Astonishment and an extensive exploration of language through the masterful use of rhyme and alliteration makes Susan Lewis’ eighth poetry collection This Visit both a tremendously enjoyable and challenging book to read. When her speakers demand, “Admit you would play dead. / Permit me to seed red // lest we strut and preen / & prophecy . . .” (15), the audience pays attention, if only for the beautiful arrangement. But there is much more to this volume than music and word play. The poet’s 857 couplets provide the reader with tantalizing clues as how we interact with each other and the surrounding world.

            The basic, in fact the only, unit of construction in This Visit is the couplet, appearing occasionally in variant forms. This fact raises significant questions for several reasons, not the least of which is what or whom do these constructs represent? Chromosomes? Noah’s menagerie? Lovers? Pilot/co-pilot? Mentor/protégé? Whatever the case, Lewis ensures the poems reflect two viewpoints:  incisive, cogent, sometimes contradictory, and always worth hearing.

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Kristina Marie Darling on the Best American Poetry blog

 

Dismantling Categories of Thought: A Conversation Between Kristina Marie Darling & Sarah Vap

ARCO IRISKMD:  I've truly enjoyed reading all three of your books, and was intrigued by the dream-like quality of the poems in Arco Iris.  They seem at once ethereal and carefully grounded in concrete imagery, rendering everyday things (like coffee, used electronics, and the sky above) suddenly and wonderfully strange.  Along these lines, many of the poems take place in an unnamed tropical location, which for the reader, is both anywhere and nowhere, a tangible place place and a psychological one. With that in mind, I'd love to hear your thoughts about the relationship between travel, the literary arts, and the human psyche.  What does travel make possible within your writing practice?  And within conscious experience? 

SV: That's interesting. I don't think of Arco Iris as dreamlike or unspecific. It's actually named a few times as South America-- many regions in South America-- a continent my partner and I traveled for a few months about nine years ago. The book is, in my experience of it and my intentions for it, a kind of anti travel-poetry. Or a rejection of the trope of travel (especially of the white traveler going to a brown place to have a "writing experience" or to buy themselves an authentic transformational experience or etc.). It is a book in which I can't write or think myself out of a scenario in which my movement in the world (as a white American, especially) is not complicit with neoliberal violence and/or globalism and its many layers and types and shades of (economic, racial, political, physical...) violences. I wonder if the ethereal experience you had of it was what I felt to be the spellcasting of capitalism--you try to say something against capitalism, it is immediately appropriated as a product of capitalism (and neutralized?), ad infinitum. 

But along those lines, after having read your Music for another life and Vow-- I'd love to ask--what do the ethereal, the dreamlike, the bride, and the book mean for you in those collections? And perhaps related, do you understand or do you think through your work on a book-by-book level, or a poem-by-poem level, or as a group of books together, or...? 

Read the whole interview here 

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A whole lot of good news from Kristina Marie Darling

This is a whole lot of trending for Kristina Marie Darling. She is this weeks blogger at the Best American Poetry website and we’ll be posting her articles all week long. Here is the first:

 

February 02, 2015

 

Formal Innovation & Textual Rupture: A Conversation Between Kristina Marie Darling & Tony Trigilio [by Kristina Marie Darling]

 

Kristina Marie Darling:  Your new book, The Complete Dark Shadows (of My Childhood), Book 1, offers readers an extended engagement with 1960s mass culture, exploring the myriad ways that television and radio shape the individual consciousness.  This idea that culture determines what is possible within thought, and within the human mind, is gracefully enacted in the content of the poems, which appear as pristine couplets.  I'm intrigued, though, by moments when the form is broken, and the poems deviate from the pattern that has been established.  As the writer, how do you know when a form should be broken?  What does breaking form make possible within the content of your work?

 

Tony Trigilio:  Thanks so much for your detailed reading of the book.  My hope is that, as you mentioned, readers can identify with the ways mass media and individual consciousness shape each other in the book.  As I get deeper into Vol. 2 of the Dark Shadows project (about half-finished with the second volume now), I gain a deeper appreciation of mass media's roots in the verb "to mediate."  I realize the connection is obvious: but it's one thing to experience media/mediation intellectually, and an entirely different thing to experience it psychically and viscerally.  Like all of us, the development of my own psyche was mediated by electronic communication—for me, it was television and radio, and for folks growing up now, it's digital media.  It just so happens that the mediating force for me was a kitschy vampire and all the nightmares he caused me (though I was way too young to understand he was kitschy).  As scary as the continual nightmares were, they did introduce me to the power of dream and to the idea that dream-reality is as vital and real as waking-reality. 

 

Read the whole interview here: http://blog.bestamericanpoetry.com/the_best_american_poetry/2015/02/formal-innovation-textual-rupture-a-conversation-between-kristina-marie-darling-tony-trigilio-by-kri.html

 

 

A review and interview about Scorched Altar in Up the Staircase Quarterly.

 

Review:  http://www.upthestaircase.org/scorched-altar.html

 

Interview:  http://www.upthestaircase.org/interview-with-kristina-marie-darling.html

 

 

And finally here is new interview at Rob McClennan's Blog: 

 

http://www.robmclennan.blogspot.ca/2015/02/12-or-20-second-series-questions-with.html

 

 

Hurray! 

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As Visuality by Anne Gorrick Now Available!

In Anne Gorrick’s richly-faceted collection A’s Visuality, found texts are held up to the light and transformed into energies that can’t be contained by convention: “Origin and then form conforms to our interest.” This is the work of a highly-engaged intelligence, and Gorrick has made her own system by moving through the world with the given that this, too, is poetry. Here, it is color— not darkness— that surrounds us. What a beautiful place she has made.

—Carolyn Guinzio


In her fourth book, Anne Gorrick explores words related to painting: phrases from art criticism and the names of paint colors. In the first section, FOLIOs, we see an unusual transformation: Writing about painting turns into writing about people (which suggests that writing about people could turn into writing about painting). In the second section, Chromatic Sweep, we enter a realm of pure abstraction, the names of colors. Colors. Gorrick, also a visual artist, shows us how much can be done with the name of a color, how many words can grow from that single seed, how many images, how many statements, how many narratives. Does every color imply all the rest, a world of colors? They do here, in “R&F Reds” and other poems:

Red truth. It calls. It satisfies.

When a red situation looks like putty

When she is thin as a blue color and exits

These violent forms of announcement

a pink greenhouse as if you were angry

—Michael Ruby


Some poems are written slant. They surfaced because their poets didn’t have an idea they imposed on the poem to develop. They surfaced because the poets respected the raw material — words — enough to get out of the way to let the words speak for themselves. When the approach works, language becomes poetry by, in part, transcending the limits of the poets’ conscious imaginations. Such has resulted from Anne Gorrick’s A’s Visuality which presents a section of poems translated from prior positionings as visual art and a second section of poems taking off from the found language of a website’s description of paint colors. The first section, Folios, is rife with surfaced wisdom: “a map / as small as / astronauts” where guidance (map) is not the astronaut’s limits (knowledge) but the astronauts’ task (and desire) to explore or expand the limits of what’s known. In the second section Chromatic Sweep, never has color become so palpable (at times even edible or radioactive): “when black and white mix, there is a lower sound” or “red play back our own choking.” Gorrick trusted the words (“No editorial / preoccupied with”) and their reciprocation are lush poems that thoughtfully invite.

—Eileen Tabios

Anne Gorrick is the author of: I-Formation (Book 2) (Shearsman Books, Bristol, UK,2012), I-Formation (Book 1) (Shearsman, 2010), and Kyotologic (Shearsman, 2008). She has also co-edited (with Sam Truitt) In|Filtration: An Anthology of Innovative Poetry from the Hudson River Valley (Station Hill Press, Barrytown, NY, forthcoming in 2015). She has collaborated with artist Cynthia Winika to produce a limited edition artists’ book called “Swans, the ice,” she said with grants through the Women’s Studio Workshop in Rosendale, NY, and the New York Foundation for the Arts. She has also collaborated on large textual and/or visual projects with John Bloomberg-Rissman and Scott Helmes. She curates the reading series, Cadmium Text ( www.cadmiumtextseries.blogspot.com ) and co-curates (with Lynn Behrendt), the electronic journal Peep/Show at  www.peepshowpoetry.blogspot.com Her visual art can be seen at: www.theropedanceraccompaniesherself.blogspot.com

Anne Gorrick lives in West Park, New York.


Book Information:

· Paperback: 120 pages

· Binding: Perfect-Bound

· Publisher: BlazeVOX [books] 

· ISBN: 978-1-60964-182-5

FULL COLOR 

$28

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A’s Visuality by Anne Gorrick Book Preview

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