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Down Stranger Roads by Roger Craik Now Available!

 No one sounds like Roger Craik. His voice, a beguilingly cosmopolitan mix of British purebred and American mutt, is the well-stamped passport he shows at border crossings from Ashtabula to Auschwitz, from Kent State to Krakow, from Amsterdam to the far-flung outposts of the human heart. This poet is most at home when far from home, prowling the shrapneled boondocks and scrap yards of Cold War history. His poems are pungent as a supper of pork and tripe and boiled cabbage, washed down with a few dark pints of the local brew. A true sojourner, he is one of our finest singers of the quiet elations and solitary illuminations of travel.

 
—George B. Bilgere, author of The White Museum which was awarded the 2009 Autumn House Poetry Prize.
 
 
What sets Roger Craik’s body of work apart from that of so many contemporaries is the quality of its savoring, the sense that human experience in all its complexity is richly rewarding when we attend to it with a keen eye and an open heart.  Therein lies the unity behind these wide-ranging, varied lyrics.  Whether the poem looks to the past or lives in the immediate, whether its setting is local or takes us to a foreign space, whether its tone is celebratory or elegiac, whether it is intimate or broaches the broader, public world, in each case it conveys the impression of an abiding sustenance for the spirit in our everyday lives.  And that impression is subtly but unmistakably strengthened by the care with which Craik uses language and savors its possibilities.  All of which means that the final savoring is ours, the readers’, each time we take up and linger over this marvelous collection.
 
Steven Reese, author of American Dervish.
 
 
 
 
Roger Craik, Associate Professor of English at Kent State University Ashtabula, has written three full-length poetry books – I Simply Stared (2002), Rhinoceros in Clumber Park (2003) and The Darkening Green (2004), and the chapbook Those Years (2007),  (translated into Bulgarian in 2009), and, most recently, Of England Still (2009). His poetry has appeared in several national poetry journals, such as The Formalist, Fulcrum, The Literary Review andThe Atlanta Review.
 
English by birth and educated at the universities of Reading and Southampton, Craik has worked as a journalist, TV critic and chess columnist. Before coming to the USA in 1991, he worked in Turkish universities and was awarded a Beineke Fellowship to Yale in 1990. He is widely traveled, having visited North Yemen, Egypt, South Africa, Tibet, Nepal, Japan, Bulgaria (where he taught during spring 2007 on a Fulbright Scholarship to Sofia University), and, more recently, the United Arab Emirates, Austria, and Croatia. His poems have appeared in Romanian, and from 2013-14 he is a Fulbright Scholar at Oradea University in Romania.
 
Poetry is his passion: he writes for at least an hour, over coffee, each morning before breakfast, and he enjoys watching the birds during all the seasons.
 
 
 
 
 
Book Information:
 
· Paperback: 102 pages
· Binding: Perfect-Bound
· Publisher: BlazeVOX [books]
· ISBN: 978-1-60964-135-1
 
$16
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Down Stranger Roads by Roger Craik Book Preview

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The Color Symphonies by Wade Stevenson Now Available!

 “This is a visionary work. It’s a torrent, a whirlwind, a symphony of colors. It’s a blazing apocalypse of rainbows, a dazzling setting sun of the material world. Surely it was written in some god-inspired, intoxicated state reflected through the rational mind of a star-struck color scientist. Gulp it, inhale it, or let it whiz by you, like a comet about to be devoured by the sun! Either way you’ll come away dazzled, blinded by the light, perhaps redeemed by the orgasmic beauty of a shared vision.”

—Aloysius Werner


“Your book flows like a wonderful ballet using the colors as movements toward a higher goal. It feels like music all the way through. I thought of Elgar’s Nimrod Variations or Beethoven’s Symphony No. 6. You have all the best parts of poetry mixed into a world that is almost the scope of a novel. I felt a great sense of warmth towards Blue. Symphony is the word for this book.”

—Geoffrey Gatza, Author of Apollo and House of Forgetting


Wade Stevenson was born in New York City in 1945. He is the author of several books of poetry, a memoir “One Time in Paris” and a novel, “The Electric Affinities.”


Book Information:

· Paperback: 290 pages

· Binding: Perfect-Bound

· Publisher: BlazeVOX [books] 

· ISBN: 978-1-60964-175-7
$18

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

The Color Symphonies by Wade Stevenson Book Preview

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Geoffrey's Health Update

 


Hello, I wanted to take a few minutes of your day and explain why I have been a bit behind in my work for the past few months and thank everyone for their kind support during a very difficult time. I have been extremely sick for most of the summer but do know that after a lot of treatment I am recovering nicely and should be back to good health in September.

I have done my very best to keep this a personal event in my life, but as I move further and further into my recovery, I have been overwhelmed by work that might be completed during my recovery. It is true that I almost died in mid July from a lung abscess and that I spent ten days in our local Veterans Hospital. I was suffering from a bout of pneumonia that began being treated on May 20th. After eight weeks things did not get better, but rather my pneumonia developed into a lung abscess, which is really rare. This had my doctors rather worried when I went back to the hospital on the 16th of July. I had expected to return home again that night with a new prescription of antibiotics, but rather, I was admitted to a quarantine room for fear I had contracted TB. This was done under an abundance of caution, as my team of doctors was certain that my lung abscess had arisen from my pneumonia. After seven days in an isolation room and several tests they determined I was not contagious nor had TB, they began treatment for the abscess in my lung. I underwent a procedure that removed the abscess that was as successful as uncomfortable. I am still working on clearing the pneumonia from my lungs with very strong antibiotics, which I will be taking for another thirty days. After that I will return to the hospital for more tests to be sure that all is well and that I am a healthy Geoffrey once again Hurray.

The good news in all of this is that I am no longer a smoker. As of tomorrow, it will be four weeks tobacco free. After ten days in the hospital it was an easy thing to quit cigarettes. Now I am just adjusting to self-identifying as a non-smoker. But that will take care of itself in no time at all. Plus, I lost twenty pounds and I look quite good. My strength is returning slowly but surely, but this summer is shot for activities.

My time in the VA hospital was great, I was well cared for by a caring nursing staff and the doctors on my team made me feel comfortable and confident that they had my condition well in hand. Considering the severity of my condition, they all were caring in the right ways. And the hospital food was pleasant as well. So hurray on that, I am glad to be back at home with my cats and Donna.

I am not now ready to return to a full work schedule, but I am able to work for an hour or two a day so as to not let things go to far afield. So if you have something pressing, I can work on it, but do know that I will be working very slowly. I would greatly prefer it if we waited in

Rockets, Geoffrey 

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Evening Train by Tom Clark Now Available!

  

In Evening Train we witness people on a bus, a window in the night, greenery, a bird on its perch—and then at the center of this world, something nameless seems to open. It’s hard to say just what happens, other than the words of each poem itself. But that isn’t quite right. It’s as if the words are a way for the poet to inscribe silence. You turn the page, wondering, and it arrives again—something quite beyond what is told. Tom Clark is a master.

—Aram Saroyan

A long time fan of Tom Clark’s poetry, I have turned to his books and blog for years to find inspiration, entertainment, and truth. His is a poetry that I can trust—at once spare and direct, witty and uncompromising, personal and universal, intelligent and deeply felt. I rely on Clark to reveal the nation I live in but often fail to see, complete with its environmental degradation, commercial excess, and kitschy spiritualism. His poems live at the intersection of truth and beauty, weaving the threads of the humdrum and the unbearable with the mystical—or at least with a longing for the mystical. Tom Clark is undoubtedly one of the great living American poets.

— Nin Andrews

Tom Clark is a master of surprise. He is a poet twenty-four hours a day and in possession of a very entertaining mind. He gets the familiar and the strange to dance together, and the dance steps are never the ones you expect. There is pathos in the humor of the situation: "First it's stuffed bunnies they're giving you. Next it's ice cream and then the nice surprise — you're at the hospital, having an operation." Clark has the ability to guide words as they "turn a nowhere into a putative somewhere" — to take the complications of mental or physical experience and redeem them in lyric poems of notable brevity. Evening Train is smart and companionable and joyously imaginative.

— David Lehman

These poems are radically, almost luridly, American, mapping out landscapes imagined, described, and entered into with stunning visual acuity and incisive intelligence. Yet the language has a spareness, a near egoless authority, giving this book wondrous aesthetic tension. Evening Train confirms what readers of this major American poet have long known: Tom Clark is a contemporary master.

—Terence Winch


Tom Clark was born in Chicago in 1941 and educated at the University of Michigan, Cambridge University and the University of Essex. He has worked variously as an editor (The Paris Review), critic (Los Angeles Times, San Francisco Chronicle) and biographer (lives of Damon Runyon, Jack Kerouac, Charles Olson, Robert Creeley, Edward Dorn), has published novels (Who is Sylvia?, The Exile of Céline, The Spell), memoirs (Jim Carroll, Late Returns: A Memoir of Ted Berrigan) and essays (The Poetry Beat, Problems of Thought: Paradoxical Essays). His many collections of poetry have includedStones, Air, At Malibu, John's Heart, When Things Get Tough on Easy Street, Paradise Resisted, Disordered Ideas, Fractured Karma, Sleepwalker's Fate, Junkets on a Sad Planet: Scenes from the Life of John Keats, Like Real People, Empire of Skin, Light and Shade, The New World, Something in the Air, Feeling for the Ground, At the FairCanyonesqueDistance and Truth Game. He lives in Berkeley, California with his wife and partner of forty-six years, Angelica Heinegg.

Book Information:

· Paperback: 102 pages

· Binding: Perfect-Bound

· Publisher: BlazeVOX [books] 

· ISBN: 978-1-60964-187-0

$16

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Evening Train by Tom Clark Book Preview,

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Reflections of Hostile Revelries by Jennifer C. Wolfe Now Available!

 

Jennifer C. Wolfe’s new collection Reflections of Hostile Revelries is the voice in our heads that needs to be spoken. In this progressive work, Wolfe targets our richest and most powerful enemies addressing their essential flaws and epic mistakes while reminding the reader these are the exact people running our countries. Reflections of Hostile Revelries is direct and honest oral poetics and will leave you tired, but eager to read on.

—Jordan Antonucci, Editor, Monkey Puzzle Press


“Jennifer Wolfe's second book, Reflections of Hostile Reveries, takes as its subject the American political landscape. In biting and often hilarious poems that spare no one, Wolfe skewers the absurdity and inanity of our politics and politicians. Everyone gets called out--from Sarah Palin to Barack Obama, from Chris Christie to the Supreme Court. Wolfe showcases her talents in a wide range of forms, from long-lined, discursive poems to haikus that burn in their intense seventeen syllables. This book demonstrates that poetry and politics make strange and wonderful bedfellows."

—Cullen Bailey-Burns, Professor of English, Century College, White Bear Lake, MN.


Jennifer C. Wolfe is a forty-five year-old writer, who grew up in Maplewood, Minnesota and studied fiction writing and poetry at Century College in White Bear Lake. Ms. Wolfe has five previous publishing credentials: a poem “If” included within the Century College (White Bear Lake, MN) Spring 2008 Student Lounge literary magazine, along with two poems “St. Patrick’s Day” and “Roller Coaster,” published within the online edition of Scrambler Magazine, Issue 39, June 2010, a poem “Flower Child” published within the online edition of The Muse – An International Journal of Poetry, Issue 1, Volume 1, June, 2011, a poem “The Beauty of the Rain” published within the online edition of The Muse – An International Journal of Poetry, Issue 2, Volume 2, June, 2012 and two poems, “Old Friends” and “New Friends” published within the online edition of The Muse – An International Journal of Poetry, Issue 3, Volume 3, June, 2013. Ms. Wolfe is listed within the poetry Directory of Writers at the Poets & Writers online magazine.

Beginning in 2008, Ms. Wolfe formed a collaborative publishing bond with BlazeVox Books of New York, under the guidance and tutelage of editor, Geoffrey Gatza. Ms. Wolfe’s publishing credentials with the press are five poetry manuscripts, Kick the Stones: Everyday Hegemony, Empire, and Disillusionment published as an eBook by BlazeVox Books, New York, October 2008, Yukon Rumination: Great Fun for All in the Land of Sarah Palin’s Joe Sixpack Alaska, published as an eBook by BlazeVox Books, New York, June 2009, Healing Optimism, and Polarization, published as an eBook by BlazeVox Books, New York, February 2010, Somewhere Over the Pachyderm Rainbow: Living in an Elephant Controlled 2010 Election Diorama, published as a print book by BlazeVox Books, New York, May, 2011, and Reflections of Hostile Revelries, published as a print book by BlazeVox Books, New York, 2013.

Somewhere Over the Pachyderm Rainbow received literary acclaim as a 2011 Indie Lit nominee for poetry.

Reflections of Hostile Revelries is Ms. Wolfe’s second print publishing with BlazeVox Books, New York.

Book Information:

· Paperback: 108 pages

· Binding: Perfect-Bound

· Publisher: BlazeVOX [books] 

· ISBN: 978-1-60964-152-8

$16

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Reflections of Hostile Revelries by Jennifer C. Wolfe Book Preview

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